Thoughts after 4 months.

 

When I first told people my plans to go move to another country I was always surprised by the reactions that people gave me. I can recall the reaction of “ YOU ARE CRAZY! ”  from my father and the hysteria of my mother upon hearing the news that I really am not going to Spain for only a year like I had told them, but instead, I would be going abroad indefinitely. After telling people my plans they would always ask me this next question, “How long are you going to be there for?” followed next by surprise when I told them my answer of a shoulder shrug and that “I really have no idea”. In reality, I really didn’t want to look into it deeper than that because the thought of me selling my car, buying a one-way ticket, and traveling 4,000 miles away from home across an ocean that my great grandparents risked their lives in to get me to where I am today, really did scare me a lot.

I was also surprised with the restrictions people seemed to place on this little plan of mine. I think that the thought that someone moves away from the US seems like a really odd concept to many Americans. Throughout primary and secondary schooling we are always taught about how hard the immigrants in the 19th and 20th century had to fight in order to have a better life and that often the United States was their goal.One thing that I think about quite often is about the bigger picture, what am I doing with my life. SOLUTION: from the many people I have spoken with, many article I have read and other information gathered on the topic there is no plan for someones life. Things just happen, and then because of that another thing happens based on the choices that you make. This linear path that people seem to associate with adulthood and old age is usually pieced together in hindsight while ignoring other facts and events that may not support this linear path.

I don’t regret coming here at all. I am not nearly as obsessed as I was before about leaving the U.S. and finding work abroad. However, this could be because I already do live and work abroad. I do miss home a lot and having to live in another country and see that your friends’ and family’s lives still go on when you are not there is pretty difficult. However, everyday it gets easier, everyday you meet new people, and every day you get used to the little differences, such as everything being closed from 2- 4 or not having a car and needing to walk/ take a bus everywhere.  

Signed, 

An American Living Abroad. 

 

In Graz, Austria

      So I have been here in Graz, Austria for about a week and a half, still with my German lacking the proper level. The things that I do like about Austria are: the amazing scenery,  mountains, and how the city just seems to perfectly fit around all the rolling hills.

     The only thing it is missing is Arnold Schwarzenegger, who is from a little outside of here, to start yodeling from on top of the clock tower pictured above.

The purpose of this blog is not to give descriptive summaries of cities that I visit, although sometimes that may happen, but instead the purpose is to give a first hand account of an American who has come to Europe to not just visit, but to live. Hopefully I can be of help to other Americans who want to do the same.